Department of Medicine

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine & UH Case Medical Center

Read about "Direct detection and quantification of abasic sites for in vivo studies of DNA damage & repair"

1 Comment »

Use of chemotherapeutic agents to induce cytotoxic DNA damage and programmed cell death is a key strategy in cancer treatments. However, the efficacy of DNA-targeted agents such as temozolomide is often compromised by intrinsic cellular responses such as DNA base excision repair (BER). Previous studies have shown that BER pathway resulted in formation of abasic or apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, and blockage of AP sites led to a significant enhancement of drug sensitivity due to reduction of DNA base excision repair. Since a number of chemotherapeutic agents also induce formation of AP sites, monitoring of these sites as a clinical correlate of drug effect will provide a useful tool in the development of DNA-targeted chemotherapies aimed at blocking abasic sites from repair. Here we report an imaging technique based on positron emission tomography (PET) that allows for direct quantification of AP sites in vivo. For this purpose, positron-emitting carbon-11 has been incorporated into methoxyamine ([(11)C]MX) that binds covalently to AP sites with high specificity. The binding specificity of [(11)C]MX for AP sites was demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments. Using [(11)C]MX as a radiotracer, animal PET studies have been conducted in melanoma and glioma xenografts for quantification of AP sites. Following induction of AP sites by temozolomide, both tumor models showed significant increase of [(11)C]MX uptake in tumor regions in terms of radioactivity concentration as a function of time, which correlates well with conventional aldehyde reactive probe (ARP)-based bioassays for AP sites.

Read the full article on CWRUmedicine.org

Dr. Afshin Dowlati discusses a new way to predict effectiveness of chemotherapy

No Comments »

Doctors often have trouble knowing who might respond to certain cancer treatments. “We kind of give chemotherapy and wish for a good result,” says Dr. Afshin Dowlati. That could change.

Dowlati led a study that revealed lung cancer patients with low levels of a molecule that controls cellular interaction have twice the chance of responding to chemotherapy than those with high levels. Those levels can also predict how likely a patient is to live a year after diagnosis. The difference could help patients decide whether to try chemotherapy, drugs or pursue alternative therapies, Dowlati says.

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

New test developed by CWRUmedicine researchers may reduce colon cancer

No Comments »

Colon cancer is the second most deadly cancer in the U.S. despite being the most preventable. The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) recently announced concern that people will neglect colon cancer screening during this economic climate.

Screening is recommended in both sexes over age 50 and earlier if a patient has a family history of this disease. However, some people put it off due to fear of having a colonoscopy, which can be both invasive and expensive. As more people lose health insurance coverage, the high cost of this procedure may lead many more people to forego screening.

Sanford Markowitz, MD, CWRUmedicine oncologist and colon cancer researcher of the University Hospitals Ireland Cancer Center at University Hospitals Case Medical Center, has developed a less expensive, non-invasive test for this disease.

About the test:

  • The non-invasive test detects DNA markers for colon cancer using a stool sample that is taken at home
  • The DNA Stool Test is available now at the doctor’s office, or can be easily ordered by the doctor
  • Although the test isn’t covered by insurance, the cost is significantly lower
  • Patients with negative results will not need to commit time and money to having a colonoscopy; patients with positive results will move forward with  colonoscopy to provide more information
  • It is 80 percent effective and while colonoscopy is still the most effective test, it is not useful if patients are avoiding it altogether
  • The American Cancer Society added the test to its screening guidelines last year

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

Watch & learn about DNA Screening for Colon Cancer

No Comments »

It is estimated that colon cancer will kill 50,000 people in the United States this year. But found early, that number could be lowered substantially. So why do so many still die from it? The answer and the solution can be found in a medical laboratory at Case Western Reserve Department of Medicine in Cleveland, Ohio.
View more videos on CWRUmedicine YouTube Channel

CWRUmedicine's Marvin T. Nieman, Ph.D. awarded The American Society of Hematology 2010 Scholar Award

1 Comment »

The program is designed to support hematologists who have chosen a career in research by providing partial salary or other support during that critical period required for completion of training and achievement of status as an independent investigator.

The awards are for two years at $50,000 per year for fellows and $75,000 per year for junior faculty.

Read more at CWRUmedicine.org

WVIZ PBS Ideastream talk with CWRUmedicine faculty about "confronting colon cancer"

1 Comment »

According to the American Cancer Society, colon cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Tonight at 7:30 p.m. on WVIZ/PBS Ideastream, several CWRUmedicine’s Hematology Oncology specialists are featured in “Confronting Colon Cancer” – an in-depth look at the disease from detection and diagnosis through treatment. Tune in tonight or watch the special online below.

To learn more about cancer research, visit CWRUmedicine.org

DNA Screening for Colon Cancer Video

No Comments »

It is estimated that colon cancer will kill 50,000 people in the United States this year. But found early, that number could be lowered substantially. So why do so many still die from it? The answer and the solution can be found in a medical laboratory in Cleveland, Ohio.

A team of researchers led by Sanford Markowitz, M.D., Ph.D. at the Case Western Reserve University Department of Medicine has found a way to detect colon cancer quickly and non-invasively.
Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

Hem Onc clinical trials

No Comments »

Matthew Cooney, MD, discusses the importance of clinical trials in cancer treatments.
Learn more about the Division of Hematoloy Oncology :: www.CWRUmedicine.org

The importance of Hem Onc clinical trials

No Comments »

Matthew Cooney, MD, discusses the importance of clinical trials in cancer treatments.
Learn more about the Division of Hematoloy Oncology :: www.CWRUmedicine.org

HemOnc approach to cancer

No Comments »

Matthew Cooney, MD, discusses the multidisciplinary approach to cancer treatment at the Department of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University.
Learn more about the Division of Hematoloy Oncology :: www.CWRUmedicine.org

Videos, Slideshows and Podcasts by Cincopa Wordpress Plugin